THOSE MYSTERIOUS THINGS CALLED CHORDS

One common challenge for worship leaders is having band members that don't play charts. This happens most often with piano players, but it also happens with string and brass players, too. Making the jump from sheet music to chord charts is a big leap, but if your musicians can do it, the versatility of your team jumps exponentially.

We won't get into a bunch of theory here. I just want to share a few things you as a leader can do to help your people face down this very scary prospect.

IT'S ADDITION/NOT SUBTRACTION
Remind your players that you asking them to add chart-reading to their skills, not switch to chart reading. Most trained musicians worked very hard to get confident with staffs and notes - they don't wanna' leave all that behind.

If you're able, keep those sheet music opportunities as a part of your worship. Let those musicians serve in that way, too.

CHORDS ARE EVERYWHERE
This may seem elementary, but I promise it'll help. Help your musicians to "zoom out" when thinking about charts. Remind them that, when their playing their specific part written on the sheet music, all the other instruments are doing the same - and that combines in such a way that builds chords.

Essentially, you're reminding your players that they've always been playing chords. It may not have been written that way, but chords have always been underneath what they do.

BRING IN A PROFESSIONAL
If you're not versatile in sheet music, bring in somebody who is. Find someone who can has a foot in both worlds and allow them to help your musicians. A pro can do better work in a shorter amount of time than you can.

In other words, don't teach what you don't know.

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What other tips do you have?
Anybody out there have experience helping sheet music folks add charts to their skill set?