WHY YOU SHOULD STOP READING BLOGS ON WORSHIP

Maybe the worst way to title a post on your own blog, huh?

A few years ago, I decided I need to change how I write about worship. I don't know it was noticeable to the 12 people who actually read this stuff, but for me, it was a big deal.

If you had time, you could probably scroll back through my posts and see the change, but that would make for a lot of reading. Since you may not have that kind of time, I'll cut to the chase. When it comes to worship...

I'm trying to write from where I live.

Every post or vlog or worship-related tweet is (hopefully) written from the perspective of this-is-how-we-do-it instead of this-is-how-you-should-do-it. Since every church context is unique and what works for my church might be a terrible idea for your church, I've tried to change the tone of what we share. The site is called "Bethelsongs" because it's about what we do in my ministry here at my church. My hope is that the stuff we do would be an encouragement and possibly bless lots of worship ministries, but I've got to write this stuff from experience.

How many times have you been emailed the "why men don't sing in church" article? What about the "why millennials leave"? Or how about the "10 worship songs we need to stop singing"? Anybody else getting tired of that?

Worship blogs have become increasingly exhausting over the years because they've stopped being testimonial. We keep reading posts about corporate worship written by professors and professional bloggers who don't plan or lead worship. Where are all the posts from guys and gals who actually lead worship week-in and week-out?

There's a place for the more large-scale, esoteric approach to cultural analysis in worship, but it sure seems one-sided. Why are we not hearing from actual worship leaders? If you're a worship leader, find a way to share what you're doing - what works and what doesn't. Not only is it a great way to journal your experiences, but it's a great way to encourage others like you!